Material Introduction

Molybdenum Copper

Material Introduction


Tungsten copper alloys are composed of molybdenum and copper. Commonly used alloys contain 10% to 60% copper. Combining the advantages of both molybdenum and copper, tungsten copper alloys can be used as military perspiration material and as microelectronic packaging material for aerospace, electronics and power applications.

We can produce molybdenum-copper alloy materials to any ratio, while the required properties of the alloy can be obtained by adjusting the ratio of molybdenum and copper.

Specifications and Performance


Typical properties of molybdenum-copper composite materials

 

Grade

Chemical composition (weight %)

Thermal expansion coefficient

Thermal conductivity

Cu

Total Impurities

Mo

Room temperature~800℃ ×10-6/K ≤/K-1

Room temperature W/m ▪ K ≥

Mo40Cu60

60±2.0

0.5

Margin

13.5

235

Mo45Cu55

55±2.0

0.5

Margin

12.5

225

Mo50Cu50

50±2.0

0.5

Margin

11.5

220

Mo55Cu45

45±2.0

0.5

Margin

11.0

215

Mo60Cu40

40±2.0

0.5

Margin

10.2

205

Mo65Cu35

35±2.0

0.5

Margin

9.3

195

Mo70Cu30

30±2.0

0.5

Margin

8.7

185

Mo75Cu25

25±2.0

0.5

Margin

8.0

180

Mo80Cu20

20±2.0

0.5

Margin

7.5

170

Mo85Cu15

15±2.0

0.5

Margin

7.0

160

Mo90Cu10

10±2.0

0.5

Margin

6.5

155

Fabrication Process


Metal powder - mixing - pressing - sintering - copper infiltration - (rolling) - processing

 

 

Advantage


Molybdenum-copper alloys feature the positive characteristics of both molybdenum and copper, including high thermal conductivity, low adjustable thermal expansion coefficient, non-magnetic, low gas content, good vacuum performance, good machinability and outstanding high temperature performance. Compared with tungsten copper, molybdenum copper alloys have the advantages of small mass combined with easy processing, rolling and stamping. Their linear expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity and key mechanical properties are equivalent to tungsten copper, offering even better application prospects.